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Mathematics » Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

Algebra I

 

Algebra I provides work with linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, systems of equations, graphing, rational and irrational expressions, polynomials, and exponents. Geometry and statistics are integrated within the course. Algebra I will have an emphasis on reading, speaking, and writing about mathematics, problem solving, and real world applications. Use of scientific calculators will be required and the use of graphing calculators will be introduced.

 

Algebra II

 

Algebra II is designed for a second year course in algebra. The course presents a variety of topics including linear and quadratic equations, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions. The properties of numbers, graphs, expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions are ideas that run throughout the course. The course will emphasize problem-solving, reading, speaking, and writing about mathematics and real world applications. Students will be expected to use the graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) to further enhance the study of algebraic concepts.

 

Honors Algebra II

 

Honors Algebra II is designed for a rigorous second year course in algebra. The course comprises a variety of topics: linear, quadratic, and higher degree polynomial functions, systems of equations and inequalities, logarithmic and exponential functions, and introductions to trigonometry and probability. The properties of rational, irrational, and complex numbers, along with the properties used to manipulate their expressions are central to the course. Every topic is explored from both an analytical and graphical perspective. Geometry is integrated within the algebra to extend the mathematics students have previously studied. Students are expected to read and write the language of mathematics and use it in classroom discussions. The course will emphasize problem-solving, reading, speaking, and writing about mathematics in both individual and group settings. Students will be expected to use the graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) to investigate concepts and solve problems.

 

Honors Geometry

 

Honors Geometry provides work with plane figure and solids and integrates algebra through the course. The student will develop reasoning skills and the concept of proof, which will be applicable in all aspects of life. The course will emphasize reading, speaking, and writing about mathematics, problem solving, real world applications, and traditional constructions with compass and straightedge. While Geometry supplies the student with mathematical tools to use within many fields of study, it also provides a rigorous development that prepares students to reason clearly throughout their lives. The student will be expected to use a graphing calculator to investigate concepts and solve problems.

 

Honors Precalculus

 

Honors Precalculus is designed for the advanced mathematics student. The pace is faster and covers a greater depth of study than the Precalculus course. The course comprises an intense review of topics from algebra and analytic geometry that are necessary for success in Calculus and subsequent mathematics courses. The topics covered will be functions, trigonometry, series, sequences and limits. Students are expected to read the language of an advanced mathematics course and use it in classroom discussion. Students will be expected to model real world application in both individual and group settings. Students will use the graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) to investigate concepts and solve problems.

 

Advanced Mathematics

 

Advanced mathematics is for the student who would like a solid preparation for college mathematics and college entrance examinations. It is intended for average students who have completed two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry. Substantial amounts of algebra and geometry are integrated with this course, allowing students to demonstrate knowledge obtained from previous math courses. The course will include units on the following: system of equations, systems of inequalities, linear programming, matrices, conic sections, function manipulations, exponential and logarithmic functions, problem solving, trigonometry, set theory, combinatorics (counting theory) and probability and statistics. To illustrate the power of these mathematical concepts, real world applications, such as linear programming and game theory, are integrated. Some units may be developed around a central problem and/or project, so the pacing and structure of units will be unlike previous math courses. Central to this course is individual exploration and discovery of mathematical concepts. Students will be expected to use the graphing calculator (TI-83/84) to investigate concepts and solve problems.

 

Statistics

 

Statistics will develop in the student the ability to analyze and solve real world problems, to think critically and communicate in writing clearly and effectively. Students will learn to develop hypotheses and construct convincing arguments using widely accepted methods for collection of data and mathematical tools for analysis. They will learn that a rigorous adherence to accepted statistical methods will validate an argument and ensure the conclusion drawn is compelling. Students will also gain a thorough understanding of probability and will be able to model real world situations using advanced probability. While Statistics supplies the student with mathematical tools to deal with many fields of study, it also prepares students to reason clearly throughout their lives.

 

Precalculus

 

Precalculus is designed for the advanced mathematics student. The course comprises an intense review of topics from algebra and analytic geometry that are necessary for success in calculus and subsequent mathematics courses. The topics covered will be functions, trigonometry, series, sequences and conics, if time permits. Students are expected to read the language of an advanced mathematics course and use it in classroom discussion. Students will be expected to model real world application in both individual and group settings. Students will use the graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) to investigate concepts and solve problems.

 

Honors Precalculus

 

Honors Precalculus is designed for the advanced mathematics student. The pace is faster and covers a greater depth of study than the Precalculus course. The course comprises an intense review of topics from algebra and analytic geometry that are necessary for success in Calculus and subsequent mathematics courses. The topics covered will be functions, trigonometry, series, sequences and limits. Students are expected to read the language of an advanced mathematics course and use it in classroom discussion. Students will be expected to model real world application in both individual and group settings. Students will use the graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) to investigate concepts and solve problems.

 

Introduction to Calculus

 

Introduction to Calculus is a course designed to introduce students to the concepts and practical applications of calculus. As an introduction, it is not meant to replace a college calculus course but rather to prepare students for college calculus. Significant time at the beginning of the year will be taken to review topics in pre-calculus. These include emphasis on polynomial and rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, and linear systems. Students will investigate the concepts of limits and continuity before learning differentiation and its applications. Techniques for differentiation and applications of the derivative will be covered in depth. Antiderivatives and the definite integral will be introduced. Students are expected to read and write the language of mathematics and use it in classroom discussions.

 

A.P. Calculus AB

 

This is a college-level calculus course intended only for the most accomplished and motivated mathematics students. All students must sit for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Examination in May. In order to cover all of the material necessary to succeed on the examination, the course has additional class time scheduled outside of the normal school day. The course begins with a comprehensive review of algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Then, coverage of limits of functions, the derivative and its applications, and the integral and its applications is provided. Students complete a review of previous AP Calculus Examinations at the end of the course in preparation for the AP Examination.

 

A.P. Calculus BC

 

This is a college-level calculus course intended only for the most accomplished and motivated mathematics students. The course includes all topics covered in the AP Calculus AB course and also presents intensive study of vectors, sequences and series, and advanced integration topics. All students must sit for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Examination in May. In order to cover all of the material necessary to succeed on the examination, the course has additional class time scheduled outside of the normal school day.

 

A.P.  Statistics 

 

The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:

  1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns
  2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study
  3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation
  4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses

Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, advanced placement or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in May.